Inclusion of Travel Technology Industry Priorities Supports Consumers & Ticket Agents

On Thursday, February 8th, the Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech), the voice of the travel technology industry and consistent advocate for public policy that supports a competitive and transparent marketplace, praised the Senate Commerce, Science, & Transportation Committee for advancing S.1939, the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2023.

“We thank the leaders of the Senate Commerce, Science, & Transportation Committee for their efforts on the FAA Reauthorization,” stated Laura Chadwick, President and CEO of Travel Tech. “The legislation includes key priorities of the Travel Technology Association, provisions that will support consumers and the Travel Tech member companies that serve them for years to come.”

S.1939 provides flexibility for Ticket Agents and air carriers alike in the presentation of ancillary fee information to consumers. It also includes a provision that protects ticket agents from liability when air carriers fail to provide accurate ancillary fee information. Following adoption of an amendment proposed by Senator Jackie Rosen (D-NV), S.1939 now also includes language to add a ticket agent representative to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Aviation Consumer Protection Advisory Committee (ACPAC).

The full Senate will likely soon consider S.1939, FAA Reauthorization Act of 2023. Once it is approved, the legislation will be conferenced with H.R. 3935, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act, passed by the U.S. House of Representatives in July 2023.

“Travel Tech will continue to advocate for its priorities that not yet included in the House and/or Senate FAA reauthorization bills, such as affirming the U.S. Department of Transportation’s current policy on refund timing for ticket agents and continuing to recognize the distinction between corporate travel agents and other types of ticket agents,” said Chadwick.

Ahead of the Senate Commerce Committee’s consideration of S.1939 last week, Travel Tech sent a letter with its recommendations. In February 2023, Travel Tech provided its top priorities for the House and Senate’s work to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration.


The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) empowers traveler choice by advocating for public policy that promotes marketplace transparency and competition. Travel Tech represents travel technology innovators ranging from dynamic startups, small, and midsize businesses to leading online travel agencies, metasearch engines, short-term rental platforms, global distribution systems, and travel management companies.

To schedule an interview with a Travel Tech spokesperson, contact Bradford Williamson of Glen Echo Group at 202.870.3234 or bwilliamson@glenechogroup.com.

Association Puts Forth Recommendations to the Senate That Reflect Ticket Agents’ Role in the Travel Marketplace

February 8, 2024 – The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) submitted a letter to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation concerning S. 1939, the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2023. The letter provides recommendations for the committee to consider ahead of the bill’s markup, including:

  1. Sec. 701: Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection. Travel Tech supports Senator Rosen’s amendment incorporated into the Manager’s Amendment that adds Ticket Agents to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection. Currently, Ticket Agents are the largest travel industry segment not represented on this key advisory committee.
  2. Sec. 703: Refunds. Ticket Agents should only be required to provide a refund when such ticket agent possesses, or have access to, the funds of a Passenger. Travel Tech asks that the Senate amend S.1939 by replacing the current language with the House-passed provision.
  3. Refund portal. Many Ticket Agents offer services beyond airfare comparison shopping and booking on their sites. Requiring them to place a refund link exclusively for airline refunds at the top of their public internet website, as the legislation currently does, will likely cause confusion among consumers seeking refunds for hotel, car rental, or tour operators. The Committee should amend this provision to achieve its intended goals.
  4. Disclosure of Ancillary Fees. Travel Tech strongly supports Sec. 705 as it provides Ticket Agents and air carriers flexibility in the design of appropriate displays of ancillary fees. Travel Tech also strongly supports that an additional provision should be added to Sec. 705 to continue to recognize the distinction between ticket agents that provide services pursuant to a corporate or government contract and other types of ticket agents. 

“We urge the Committee to adopt our recommendations to support travelers and the Travel Tech member companies that serve them,” said Laura Chadwick, President and CEO of Travel Tech.


The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) empowers traveler choice by advocating for public policy that promotes marketplace transparency and competition. Travel Tech represents travel technology innovators ranging from dynamic startups, small, and midsize businesses to leading online travel agencies, metasearch engines, short-term rental platforms, global distribution systems, and travel management companies.

To schedule an interview with a Travel Tech spokesperson, contact Bradford Williamson of Glen Echo Group at 202.870.3234 or bwilliamson@glenechogroup.com.

Major Activity Anticipated by Congress, Regulatory Agencies, and State Legislatures in 2024

January 10, 2024 — With Members of Congress returning to Capitol Hill this week, Travel Tech released a briefing on the state of play for public policy impacting the travel industry. As interest in travel continues to rebound with consumers and policymakers, the association is keyed into ongoing legislative and regulatory fights on behalf of travel tech companies. 

Advocating for One National Mandatory Fee Price Transparency Law and Enforcement Fairness for Travel Tech Companies

Policymakers on both the federal and state levels continue to pursue efforts to hold hotels accountable when they withhold information about their mandatory fees from travelers. Travel Tech supports a single, national standard and a common-sense provision to account for situations when hotels fail to provide accurate and complete information to price comparison sites.

Action Areas: Federal Trade Commission’s Trade Regulation Rule on Unfair or Deceptive Fees proposed rule (NPRM) (comments due February 7, 2024), S. 2498, the Hotel Transparency Act of 2023, and H.R. 6543, the No Hidden Fees on Extra Expenses for Stays (FEES) Act.

Anticipating Final Rules on Refunds and Ancillary Fee Transparency by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) in February and March

According to the federal government’s Unified Regulatory Agenda, the DOT will issue its final rules on Airline Ticket Refunds and Consumer Protections in February and Enhancing Transparency of Airline Ancillary Service Fees in March of this year. Travel Tech filed comprehensive comments on both proposed rules, as each will majorly impact the travel technology industry. 

Action Areas: DOT’s Airline Ticket Refunds and Consumer Protections and Enhancing Transparency of Airline Ancillary Service Fees Notice of Proposed Rulemakings

Securing Travel Tech’s Priorities in the Long-Term Reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) by Congress

The second extension of the FAA expires on Friday, March 8, 2024. The U.S. Senate Commerce Committee will likely soon schedule a markup of S. 1939, the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2023. In July 2023, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 3935, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act. Both pieces of legislation include major Travel Tech priorities, and the association continues to advocate actively for provisions included in S.1939.

Action Areas: S. 1939, the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2023 and H.R. 3935, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act 

American Innovation and Choice Online Act

Travel Tech supports S.2033, the American Innovation and Choice Online Act (AICOA) to address the vast inequities resulting from extremely large search platforms, like Google, abusing their dominant position and undermining competition. 

Action Areas: S.2033, the American Innovation and Choice Online Act (AICOA) 

Ensuring the Responsible Use of AI in Travel

Both state and federal policymakers are grappling with how AI tools should be regulated. Given the concerns about inaccurate or outdated information and recommendations, copyright issues, ethical risks and more, the use of AI in travel may soon be a focal point in such discussions. Travel Tech will engage with policymakers on the responsible use of AI in the travel sector. 

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The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) empowers traveler choice by advocating for public policy that promotes marketplace transparency and competition. Travel Tech represents travel technology innovators ranging from dynamic startups, small, and midsize businesses to leading online travel agencies, metasearch engines, short-term rental platforms, global distribution systems, and travel management companies.

To schedule an interview with a Travel Tech spokesperson, contact Bradford Williamson of Glen Echo Group at 202.870.3234 or bwilliamson@glenechogroup.com.

Ahead of the return of Congress to Washington, D.C. next week, Travel Tech has met with U.S. Senate offices to discuss the airline refund obligations of ticket agents. Late last year, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), in its proposed Airline Ticket Refunds and Consumer Protections rulemaking, sought to require ticket agents to refund customers within seven days, even if the airline had not yet returned the funds.

Travel Tech successfully advocated for bill language included in the U.S. House of Representatives-passed FAA Reauthorization that would require a refund only when such ticket agent possesses, or has access to, the funds of a passenger.

“Simply put: our members can only refund what they have in their possession. The DOT’s proposed rule on the timing of refunds places ticket agents in a precarious financial position, no matter their size, having to make refunds without first receiving the customers’ funds back from airlines,” said Laura Chadwick, president & CEO of Travel Tech. 

“We were pleased the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee heard us and included this sensible provision in their bill,” Chadwick continued. “We are continuing our efforts to secure a similar provision in the U.S. Senate’s FAA Reauthorization.”

As it stands today, the authorization for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will expire on September 30, 2023. The Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee has not yet considered or cleared its FAA Reauthorization legislation due to an ongoing impasse over pilot training requirements.

Inclusion of Travel Technology Industry Priorities Support Travelers and Industry Members

On Thursday, July 20th, the Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech), the voice of the travel technology industry and consistent advocate for public policy that supports a competitive and transparent marketplace, praised legislators for advancing H.R. 3935, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act through the U.S. House of Representatives.

“We thank the leaders of the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee for their exceptional efforts on the FAA Reauthorization,” stated Laura Chadwick, President and CEO of Travel Tech. “H.R. 3935, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act, includes key priorities for which Travel Tech expressly advocated to better support travelers and the Travel Tech member companies that serve them.

“We are also especially grateful to Rep. Dina Titus and Rep. Gus Bilirakis, chairs of the House Travel & Tourism Caucus, along with Reps. John Garamendi, Marco Molinaro, and Susan Brownley for introducing H.R. 3780, the ACPAC Modernization Act,” said Chadwick. “Due to Rep. Titus’s leadership, ticket agents are one step closer to being able to offer their unique expertise on improving airline customer service.”

H.R. 3780, the ACPAC Modernization Act, was merged into the House-passed FAA Reauthorization bill (H.R. 3935). It will add a ticket agent representative to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Aviation Consumer Protection Advisory Committee (ACPAC).

Prior to the House vote on H.R. 3935, Travel Tech sent a letter to Congress to express its support for the legislation. Travel Tech’s letter, however, noted its opposition to the inclusion of Section 701 of the bill, which repeals the DOT’s long-standing Full Fare Advertising Rule. This rule requires that the entire price for airfare, including taxes and fees, be disclosed to consumers in the first instance following an itinerary search.

Laura Chadwick, Travel Tech’s President & CEO, argued that “Its repeal will undermine consumers’ ability to effectively comparison shop and choose the best travel option to meet their needs and budget.”

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The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) empowers traveler choice by advocating for public policy that promotes marketplace transparency and competition. Travel Tech represents the leading innovators in travel technology, including online travel agencies, metasearch engines, short-term rental platforms, global distribution systems, and travel management companies.

To schedule an interview with a Travel Tech spokesperson, contact Dan Rene of kglobal at 202-329-8357 or daniel.rene@kglobal.com.

On Wednesday, July 19th, the Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) sent a letter to Congress to express its support for H.R. 3935, the Securing Growth and Robust Leadership in American Aviation Act, in advance of the U.S. House of Representatives’ vote on the legislation later this week. H.R. 3935 will reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and related aviation programs for the next five years. It includes several key provisions sought by Travel Tech to improve airline travel for consumers and support the Travel Tech member companies that serve them.

Travel Tech’s letter, however, noted its opposition to the inclusion of Section 701 of the bill, which repeals the DOT’s long-standing Full Fare Advertising Rule. This rule requires that the entire price for airfare, including taxes and fees, be disclosed to consumers in the first instance following an itinerary search. Laura Chadwick, Travel Tech’s President & CEO, argued that, “Its repeal will undermine consumers’ ability to effectively comparison shop and choose the best travel option to meet their needs and budget.”

On Thursday, July 13th, Laura Chadwick, President & CEO of the Travel Technology Association, was featured alongside John Breyault from the National Consumers League in an NBC News story about efforts to repeal the Full Fare Advertising Rule. Under the current rule, the Department of Transportation (DOT) requires any advertised airfare to include the total cost to the consumer for the ticket, including all applicable government taxes/fees and any mandatory carrier-imposed surcharges. However, a provision in the House FAA Reauthorization bill would eliminate this requirement and instead allow airlines to advertise ticket prices without including government taxes and other required fees.

Chadwick and Breyault both expressed concerns over efforts to change this rule. As Chadwick stated, “You can’t comparison shop on the checkout page. It’s essential to put that information up front, the first place where consumers see the airfare.”

“Travel is expensive,” Chadwick also said. “We believe consumers should have the most information upfront so they can make effective decisions, comparison shop for the best value, and feel good about their purchases in the end.”

Read the full story here.

About Travel Tech

The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) empowers traveler choice by advocating for public policy that promotes marketplace transparency and competition. Travel Tech represents the leading innovators in travel technology, including global distribution systems, online travel agencies, metasearch companies, travel management companies, and short-term rental platforms.

To schedule an interview with a Travel Tech spokesperson, contact Dan Rene of kglobal at 202-329-8357 or daniel.rene@kglobal.com.

Key Provisions Impacting the Travel Technology Industry Included

The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech), the voice of the travel technology industry and consistent advocate for public policy that supports a competitive and transparent marketplace, applauds the introduction of the House and Senate’s FAA Reauthorization bills.

“We thank the leaders of the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee and the Senate Commerce Committee for their exceptional efforts on the FAA Reauthorization. Travel Tech released its top priorities for this legislation earlier this year. Both bills feature key provisions that we expressly advocated for to better support travelers and the Travel Tech member companies that serve them,” stated Laura Chadwick, president, and CEO of Travel Tech.

The House legislation includes critical language relating to the refund obligations of ticket agents, a top Travel Tech priority. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), in its proposed Airline Ticket Refunds and Consumer Protections rulemaking released late last year, sought to require ticket agents to make refunds to customers within seven days, even if the funds had not yet been returned by the airline. Travel Tech successfully advocated for bill language that would require a refund only when such ticket agent possesses, or has access to, the funds of a passenger.

“Simply put: our members can only refund what they have in their possession. The DOT’s proposed rule on the timing of refunds places ticket agents in a precarious financial position, no matter their size, having to make refunds without first receiving the customers’ funds back from airlines. We are glad the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee heard us and included this sensible provision in their draft bill. We will work hard to ensure this provision and our other priorities are included in the final legislation passed by Congress.”

The House version of the FAA Reauthorization legislation will also add a “ticket agent” representative to the Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Aviation Consumer Protection Advisory Committee (ACPAC). Last week, Reps. Dina Titus (D-NV), Gus Bilirakis (R-FL), John Garamendi (D-CA), Marc Molinaro (R-NY), and Julia Brownley (D-CA), introduced standalone legislation, H.R. 3780 — the ACPAC Modernization Act, to do the same.

“We’re pleased to be included as a formal representative on ACPAC as well the new Passenger Experience Advisory Committee,” Chadwick said. “This recognition of the travel technology industry’s unique expertise comes at a critical time and reinforces the pivotal role our members contribute to enhancing the travel experience.”

“We are also grateful to see our point of view on ancillary fee display flexibility affirmed in the Senate legislation. Our members are the pioneers in consistently supporting consumer access to information to allow them to make informed decisions and know the total costs involved as they make travel plans,” stated Chadwick.

Earlier this year, Travel Tech submitted comments to the U.S. Department of Transportation on their proposed “Enhancing Transparency of Airline Ancillary Service Fees” rulemaking. Travel Tech also filed a hearing petition to challenge the DOT’s requirement in the rule to display the critical ancillary fee information on the first page of online search results, and presented key public opinion survey results to support their position.

About Travel Tech

The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) empowers traveler choice by advocating for public policy that promotes marketplace transparency and competition. Travel Tech represents the leading innovators in travel technology, including global distribution systems, online travel agencies, metasearch companies, travel management companies, and short-term rental platforms.

To schedule an interview with a Travel Tech spokesperson, contact Dan Rene of kglobal at 202-329-8357 or daniel.rene@kglobal.com.

On Monday, June 5th, the Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech), launched its new Travel Tech Policy Action Center to offer industry members a means to communicate directly with their elected representatives and show support for key Travel Tech public policy priorities.

The inaugural action asks industry members to tell their member of Congress to co-sponsor H.R. 3780, the ACPAC Modernization Act, which would add “Ticket Agents” to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Aviation Consumer Protection Advisory Committee (ACPAC). This is one of Travel Tech’s major priorities for the FAA Reauthorization legislation that must pass Congress by September 30th.

Congresswoman Dina Titus (D, NV-01) and Congressman Gus Bilirakis (R, FL-12), chairs of the House Travel & Tourism Caucus, along with Rep. Marc Molinaro (R, NY-19), Rep. John Garamendi (D, CA-08), and Rep. Julia Brownley (D, CA-26), introduced H.R. 3780, the ACPAC Modernization Act on June 1st.

About Travel Tech

The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) empowers traveler choice by advocating for public policy that promotes marketplace transparency and competition. Travel Tech represents the leading innovators in travel technology, including global distribution systems, online travel agencies, metasearch companies, travel management companies, and short-term rental platforms.

To schedule an interview with a Travel Tech spokesperson, contact Dan Rene of kglobal at 202-329-8357 or daniel.rene@kglobal.com.

ACPAC Modernization Act Will Benefit Consumers and Lead to Better DOT Policy

The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech), the voice of the travel technology industry and consistent advocate for public policy that supports a competitive and transparent marketplace, applauds the introduction of legislation today that would add ticket agent representatives to the Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Aviation Consumer Protection Advisory Committee (ACPAC).

The legislation, introduced by Reps. Dina Titus (D-NV), Gus Bilirakis (R-FL), John Garamendi (D-CA), Marc Molinaro (R-NY) and Julia Brownley (D-CA), would allow ACPAC to garner the unique and critical perspectives of ticket agents who support millions U.S. of travelers.

It’s why earlier this year, Travel Tech stated its primary policy priority as part of the FAA Reauthorization Act was to have Congress “amend the law to add a Ticket Agent representative to ACPAC to expand its industry knowledge base and improve the quality of its recommendations, ultimately benefiting consumers.” The term “Ticket Agent” is defined in law as “a person (except an air carrier, a foreign air carrier, or an employee of an air carrier or foreign air carrier) that as a principal or agent sells, offers for sale, negotiates for, or holds itself out as selling, providing, or arranging for, air transportation.” (49 U.S.C. § 40102(a)(45)).

In response to the introduction of this important legislation, Laura Chadwick, president CEO of Travel Tech, stated:

“On behalf of Travel Tech’s membership, I am grateful to Rep. Dina Titus and Rep. Gus Bilirakis, chairs of the House Travel & Tourism Caucus, along with Reps. John Garamendi, Marco Molinaro, and Susan Brownley for introducing the ACPAC Modernization Act. By adding ticket agents to the US Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Aviation Consumer Protection Advisory Committee (ACPAC), Congress will better equip the advisory committee to address growing airline customer service issues.

Online ticket agents sell approximately 50% of all airline tickets to consumers every year, putting them in the distinctive position to share a deep knowledge and understanding of refunds, ancillary fees, and cutting-edge technology. Our important perspective has been missing at ACPAC. The technical expertise and long-standing commitment to innovation by Travel Tech members will strengthen efforts to support airline customers.”

ACPAC represents the nearly 700 million airline passengers that fly in the U.S. each year. Unlike many other federal consumer-focused advisory groups, the committee is currently comprised of just four members – an air carrier representative, an airport operator, a state or local government representative, and a consumer advocate.

About Travel Tech

The Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) empowers traveler choice by advocating for public policy that promotes marketplace transparency and competition. Travel Tech represents the leading innovators in travel technology, including global distribution systems, online travel agencies, metasearch companies, travel management companies, and short-term rental platforms.

To schedule an interview with a Travel Tech spokesperson, contact Dan Rene of kglobal at 202-329-8357 or daniel.rene@kglobal.com.

Travel Technology Association Applauds Legislation Adding Ticket Agents to ACPAC

Travel Tech Celebrates Members’ Commitment to Innovation

February 28, 2024

The Association Launches Online Resource to Highlight Its New Advocate Members and Others February 28, 2024 – Today, the Travel Technology Association (Travel Tech) launched its “Innovate” page to highlight the contributions and efforts of its member companies working to empower traveler choice and pioneer new technologies and tools to improve the travel experience.  The […]